Paper and Pulp Market In-Depth Analysis by Opportunities, Challenges, Key Market Segments & Forecast for 5 years

Paper and Pulp, Business, Paper
Image credit: Paper and Pulp market reports 2022

By Nidhi Bhawsar | The Newsman

HTF MI recently broadcasted a new study in its database that highlights the in-depth market analysis with future prospects of Paper and Pulp market. The study covers significant data which makes the research document a handy resource for managers, industry executives and other key people get ready-to-access and self-analyzed study along with graphs and tables to help understand market trends, drivers and market challenges. Some of the key players mentioned in this research are Stora Enso (FI), Fibria (BR), RGE (SG), Sappi (ZA), UMP (FI), ARAUCO (CL), CMPC (CL), APP (SG), Metsa Fibre (FI), Suzano (BR), IP (US), Resolute (CA), Ilim (RU), Sdra Cell (SE), Domtar (US), Nippon Paper (JP), Mercer (CA), Eldorado (BR), Cenibra (BR), Oji Paper (JP), Ence (ES), Canfor (CA), West Fraser (CA), SCA (SE), Chenming (CN), Sun Paper (CN), Yueyang (CN), Yongfeng (CN) & Huatai (CN).

Get Access to sample pages @ https://www.htfmarketreport.com/sample-report/955145-united-states-paper-and-pulp-market-2

The research covers the current market size of the United States Paper and Pulp market and its growth rates based on 5 year history data. It also covers various types of segmentation such as by geography [The West, Southwest, The Middle Atlantic, New England, The South & The Midwest], by product /end user type [Bleached Softwood Kraft Pulp (BSK), Birch Hardwood Kraft Pulp (BHK) & High Yield Pulp (HYP)], by applications [Printing and Writing Paper, Tissue Paper & Other] in overall market. The in-depth information by segments of Paper and Pulp market helps monitor performance & make critical decisions for growth and profitability. It provides information on trends and developments, focuses on markets and materials, capacities, technologies, CAPEX cycle and the changing structure of the United States Paper and Pulp Market.

For more information or any query mail at sales@htfmarketreport.com
This study also contains company profiling, product picture and specifications, sales, market share and contact information of various international, regional, and local vendors of United States Paper and Pulp Market, some of them are Stora Enso (FI), Fibria (BR), RGE (SG), Sappi (ZA), UMP (FI), ARAUCO (CL), CMPC (CL), APP (SG), Metsa Fibre (FI), Suzano (BR), IP (US), Resolute (CA), Ilim (RU), Sdra Cell (SE), Domtar (US), Nippon Paper (JP), Mercer (CA), Eldorado (BR), Cenibra (BR), Oji Paper (JP), Ence (ES), Canfor (CA), West Fraser (CA), SCA (SE), Chenming (CN), Sun Paper (CN), Yueyang (CN), Yongfeng (CN) & Huatai (CN). The market competition is constantly growing higher with the rise in technological innovation and M&A activities in the industry. Moreover, many local and regional vendors are offering specific application products for varied end-users. The new vendor entrants in the market are finding it hard to compete with the international vendors based on quality, reliability, and innovations in technology.

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Article source: https://thefreenewsman.com/paper-and-pulp-market-in-depth-analysis-by-opportunities-challenges-key-market-segments-forecast-for-5-years/87024/

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Eight awesome metrics that every content marketer should be using

Metrics, Business, Social Engagement
Image source: MarketingMag.com

By Nate Vickery, Editor at Bizzmark Blog

Content marketing is subjective and can’t be measured by tangible metrics, right? Not true, says Nate Vickery. Content marketing is as much about creativity as it is about knowing your audience, so marketers need to know how to measure what’s working.

One of the major problems content marketers face is not knowing how to track the effectiveness of their content. Many believe that content marketing is subjective and that it depends on some intangible metrics, but it’s not true. There is a wide range of specific metrics that can tell you which strategies really drive more traffic to your site, boost conversions or increase your revenue. All you have to do is learn how to separate the right KPIs from those that may distract you.

With this in mind, here are eight awesome metrics every content marketer should monitor:

1. The bounce rate

The bounce rate shows how many visitors leave your site after viewing just one page. This metric provides you with an invaluable insight, helping you understand your target audience. It gives you an opportunity to find out why someone lands on your site and then kicks it before completing the desired action. It could be a poor page load speed? Maybe your content is not relevant to them or the overall appeal of the site is not that positive. What about your menu and navigation? How clear and user-friendly are they?

The only problem with this metric is that it’s usually misunderstood, as it can sometimes be quite murky. For instance, if someone clicks on your link from Facebook and leaves your site after reading your article from beginning to end, this still counts as a bounce – this is why you shouldn’t rely on this metric solely when determining the success of your content.

2. Retention metric

The name says it all – retention metrics show how many people return to your site. These metrics include stuff like return visitors and the frequency of returns – they are insanely important to content marketers as they actually show how well your content resonates with your readers. If it’s relevant, informative and engaging enough, they will come back. Most importantly, they will see you as a reliable and trusted source of information. Remember, attracting new visitors to your site is important, but retaining them and boosting their loyalty to your brand is the foundation of your content marketing strategy.

3. Time spent on page

It’s good to know the average amount of time your readers spend on your site since it shows how engaged they are with your content. So if you’ve published a comprehensive 2000-word guide and you see that people leave it after two minutes, this means that they’re not reading it. The same goes for your videos, infographics and podcasts. If your visitors aren’t interested in reading, watching or listening to your content from beginning to end, this means that you’re either targeting the wrong people or that you’re failing to bring value to them.

The major problem with this metric is that it doesn’t really tell you if your readers are actively engaged. For example, if someone opens your article, but then gets distracted by a phone call and spends 15 minutes on that page without reading…Continue reading

Article source: https://www.marketingmag.com.au/hubs-c/opinoin-nate-vickery-eight-awesome-content-marketing-metrics/

Do You Have a Team of Avengers?

The Avengers, Marvel Comics
Image Source: larepublica.pe

We are familiar with the popularity of The Avengers, a comic book series of fictional superheroes published by Marvel Comics. Each character possesses special covert powers and abilities to fight evil forces and save humanity. Yet, there is a takeaway from the storylines of The Avenger series that you can apply to the business operations of your company.

As you examine each member of your team do you take the time to access the scope of talents and abilities each person brings to your business? If you have not closely examined your employee’s specialty niches, then you are wasting valuable talent and shortchanging your company’s growth potential.

Do you have a member of your team who is like the Black Panther (T’Challa) a brilliant tactician, strategist, scientist, and tracker? Or an Ironman (Tony Stark) a genius level intellect who can invent a wide range of sophisticated specialized devices? Or perhaps you have a Black Widow, who is an expert spy knowing what the competition is planning and has devised a plan on how to penetrate the competition’s weakest link?

If you think about a sports team for a minute, you can clearly see that in football everyone cannot be the quarterback or kicker. In basketball, everyone cannot be a point guard or center. In motorsports, everyone cannot be a pit crew chief or racecar driver. Each member of a team has a specialized talent and sometimes leaders fail to identify the value of an individual attribute to the team’s overall success. How would you equip these individuals with the tools, training, and education needed to take your company to the top? Perhaps you can take something from the playbook of The Avengers to teach you how.

No Marketing Budget? No Problem. Grow Your Business Using These 5 Tactics

Writing, Marketing, Business
Image credit: boonchoke/Shutterstock

Promoting your business can seem daunting when you have little or no budget for marketing. Fortunately, there are many marketing strategies that are easy to try and that are free.

You’ve built a great product or perhaps opened a sleek, new store – everything is ready. The big question, however, is do your potential customers know that you exist?

One of the hardest aspects of starting a business is acquiring customers. Marketing is the practice of telling potential customers about your business and educating them about what you do until they become a customer. Traditionally, marketing involved expensive TV commercials and billboard ads. Further adding to the challenge is that these marketing tactics are difficult to measure and change. Once you spend thousands of dollars on a billboard, you can’t rip it down every week to make adjustments.

Luckily, the new age of marketing has introduced novel strategies that anyone can start with, and, best of all, they are free. That’s right: You can start marketing your product or service today with a budget of $0.

Let’s examine some of the best free tactics to try.

Content

In the old days, marketing was about “pushing” information to your target audience. Today, so many marketing messages are pushed on people that this tactic has become harder to pull off. Instead, savvy marketers use pull tactics to bring the target market to you. One of the most effective ways to execute pull marketing is through content.

Content refers to valuable information online – e-books, blog posts, infographics, etc. – that provide value to your target audience. Ideally, the content matches what your potential customers might be searching for on Google. For example, if you are starting a meal kit delivery service, you might create a well-designed guide titled “5 Delicious Recipes You Can Cook in 30 Minutes.” People who are searching for recipes may also be interested in a meal kit.

The goal of your content is not to advertise. Instead, it is to educate. Your content needs to provide value to your potential customers, and they may read several articles on your blog (or e-books) before making a purchase.

Keep in mind, content strategy takes a long time and requires a lot of work. You need to be writing every day. You may need a graphic designer to help. If you can write and design yourself, then starting to market with content won’t cost you a dime!

Social media

In the mid-2000s, social media exploded as a new marketing frontier. People were purchasing smartphones and using new social networks like Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn. Today, these products are more mature and billions of people use them every day. As a result, social media has become wildly popular for advertising. You can start using social media platforms to engage your target audience for free. Here are some examples of what you can do:

  • If you’re a restaurant, post delicious food photos on Instagram.
  • If you’re a B2B software company, post how-to guides on LinkedIn.
  • If you’re a new product for moms, post childcare tips on Twitter and Pinterest.

Each social media platform appeals to different types of people; it’s important to research where your target customers spend the most time online. For example, you will find more business buyers on LinkedIn rather than Snapchat, but if you’re selling a product for teenagers, snap away.

Creating accounts and posting on social media is completely free. If you create compelling posts with stories and photos, you can certainly build a following without a budget.

Referrals

The best marketing is organic. This means you don’t have to do any additional work to get each new customer. Instead, your customers market the product for you. This typically happens through referrals: Customers tell their friends about your product. It could mean a customer inviting a friend to your restaurant because they tried it and liked it, or, perhaps, a customer is using your software and told a colleague about how helpful it was.

To make a referral program work, be sure you incorporate the following elements in your program:

  • Make it easy: Have a button on your website for people to share and invite friends.
  • Offer an incentive: Reward customers that refer the most individuals; perhaps the incentive could be a one-time discount.
  • Congratulate success: Whenever a customer refers someone, reach out to thank them.
  • Always ask: Don’t expect people to make referrals automatically. Respectfully ask.

Webinars

Webinars are online presentations where you teach listeners about a topic of interest. They have become incredibly popular and cost a fraction compared to a presentation at a trade show or other venue. Your potential customers from anywhere in the world can dial in and watch the webinar.

To create a good webinar, identify a topic that your potential customers might want to learn about. Create a presentation with slides and perhaps invite other experts (or one of your customers) to co-host the webinar with you. This will encourage them to promote it to their network and help you grow.

Webinars typically require a software program like GoToWebinar to host. Aside from this, there are no other costs, except your time.

Press

Getting press can be an incredible way to get highly impactful, free marketing. In the early days, the best way to get press is to have a remarkable product or service. If your store has a unique product, or your software does something cool and new, it will attract attention from the media, who, in turn, want to write an interesting article for their readers.

If you are starting a local business, reach out to nearby publications to announce a grand opening special. Pitch them a compelling story about why you started your business. If you are building something that is not location-specific, you can contact bloggers and small publications to see if any would be interested in telling your story.

It can take a long time to build relationships with publications. The first step is to establish yourself as an expert in your industry by writing quality content, as noted earlier. As a result, you will have more credibility in the eyes of the press, and thus more opportunity to have your stories published.

Article source: https://www.business.com/articles/free-marketing-tactics/

SPN Spaces: UNO’s Center for Innovation, Entrepreneurship & Franchising

Innovation, Tech
Image Source: http://siliconprairienews.com

By  | Silicon Prairie News

SPN Spaces is a new series that takes a look inside the region’s most inspiring startups, workspaces, incubators, accelerators and organizations.

Inside Mammel Hall on the south side of the University of Nebraska at Omaha’s campus is the Center for Innovation, Entrepreneurship & Franchising. The Center supports entrepreneurial education and collaboration, innovative hands-on learning experiences, as well as faculty research, conferences and mentorship. CIEF also provides advisory services to start-ups and small business entities throughout the region.

The CIEF website says the center serves as a bridge between the entrepreneurs of tomorrow and the diverse entrepreneurial community in the Omaha, Nebraska area. SPN dropped in on UNO’s Maverick Startups class led by Dr. Dale T. Eesley, Director and John Morgan Community Chair in Entrepreneurship to talk more about how the CIEF and UNO are preparing the region’s next wave of founders.

Center for Innovation, Entrepreneurship & Franchising at University of Nebraska at Omaha’s College of Business Administration

Lead by: Dr. Dale T. Eesley, Director & John Morgan Community Chair in Entrepreneurship

SPN: What classes and programs does UNO offer through the CIEF that are supporting the Silicon Prairie’s next generation of business founders?

DE: The CIEF at UNO’s College of Business Administration offers a wide range of entrepreneurial classes, all of which have a heavy applied focus.  These include Entrepreneurial Foundations, Maverick Startups, New Venture Formation, Entrepreneurial Finance, Social Venturing, Entrepreneurial Selling, Commercializing Technology and Technology Ventures (IS&T students paired up with Business students in teams).

We also have a number of classes taught by faculty outside the College of Business Administration including Media Entrepreneurship, Geography, Gender & Entrepreneurship, Political Entrepreneurship, Entrepreneurship & the Arts, Entrepreneurship & Leadership in British Literature, and Creativity & Innovation in Organizations (taught by the Psychology department).

SPN: How are you emulating real-life business problems and experiences in the classroom?

DE: Classes such as Entrepreneurial Foundation and Social Venturing have hands-on projects where they apply their classroom learning to solve problems for local startups, businesses and non-profit organizations.  In Maverick Startups students engage in customer discovery and validation with 50 potential customers using their own concepts and business models.  New Venture Formation and Technology Ventures are classes where students work on their own business concepts and try to create new businesses or at least test their viability.

A new program we have started, the Maverick Venture Fund, trains 12 students a year on how to do seed-stage investing.  After a semester of training, they make actual investments in student, alumni, and community startups.  It doesn’t get any more real than that!  By the way, if you are searching for funding, please apply to pitch your venture to the fund!

SPN: Do things like startup classes and entrepreneurial groups in college give students an advantage over their self-taught peers once they graduate?

DE: Our classes are very hands-on and applied classes always enhance students’ ability to understand and master the content, so it stays with them long after graduation.  Our students have to venture “outside the building” and in so doing, they learn about the startup community in Omaha.  So compared to the self-taught, they know where to go for advice, partners and funding when they are ready to launch a new company.  Our graduates tend to stay in the Omaha area, so the connections they make through our classes have long-term benefits.

SPN: How are you teaching young entrepreneurs to look at their talents and skills (everything from music, to design, to athletics) differently?

DE: In our classes, we train students to think empathetically and to really understand their customers’ true needs.  We do this by having them identify their interests and experiences and then identify an area in which they can contribute.  We also use Gallup’s Builder Profile assessment to help them better understand how their talents can be used to create solutions.  We emphasize the development of an entrepreneurial mindset that can be used for much more than starting a new venture.  For example, our classes in Journalism, Political Science, Theater and Psychology apply entrepreneurial thinking and processes to topics far outside of business.

In the last two years, we have offered an Entrepreneurial Living Learning Community where freshman live together, take cohort classes, travel to places like Denver and Silicon Valley and engage in 30 hours of entrepreneurial activity each semester.  This is an incredible way for them to explore their entrepreneurial interests and what they discover about themselves helps shape what they do and the way they do it throughout their college experience.

SPN: Every entrepreneur will experience at least one “small failure” in their career. What advice do you give students for when they inevitably face setbacks?

My best advice, and one we teach in our classes, is that the startup process is a search for information, and failures are really important pieces of information!  By taking the steps to minimize the financial risk in the earliest stages, students will have the ability to fail fast multiple times while searching for the right business model.  I also support students who start their careers working for others because it lets them build their skills, save money, and let their employers pay the price for their early mistakes.  At the same time, if they have a great idea, I think now is the perfect time to go for it, before they are saddled with responsibilities and commitments we take on as older adults.

SPN: What CIEF events are coming up that will give the community a chance to get involved with the program and UNO? 

The CIEF offers a lot of events and programs outside of the classroom to enhance their entrepreneurial development.  We are always in search of judges, mentors, and sponsors for events such as:

We are particularly excited about this year’s Midwest Entrepreneurship Conference April 6 & 7. Over 400 people from Omaha and more than 25 universities will come together to learn from speakers that include billionaires, shark tank contestants and social entrepreneurs.  There’s something for everybody and it is open to the public.

Article source: http://siliconprairienews.com/2018/02/spn-spaces-unos-center-innovation-entrepreneurship-franchising/

8 tips for getting social media ads right

Social Media, Ads
Image Source: Marketing Land

Original post – By  on December 29, 2017

A friend recently complained to me that the targeted ads that persistently stud her social media feeds are not only disruptive but also frequently irrelevant. She uses social media primarily to keep track of friends and to follow artists and crafters that could offer her inspiration or technical knowledge.

As she vented her frustration, I wondered why the ads she saw were still so consistently missing the mark despite the great leaps in ad targeting technology. Surely there must be a better way for brands to reach audiences through social media.

Surprisingly, though almost two-thirds of social media users are irritated by the number of promotions that clutter their feeds, and 26 percent actively ignore marketing content, a whopping 62 percent follow at least one brand on social media.

According to the GlobalWebIndex, 42 percent of social media users are there to “stay in touch” with their friends, while over a third are also interested in following current events, finding entertaining content or killing time. Though 27 percent of users find or research products on social media, most usage is skewed toward building relationships. As such, it’s clear why many social media users are annoyed by ads they find intrusive, irrelevant or boring.

While this data helps us understand why users may find ads abrasive, it also gives us a glimpse into why they are so open to following brands on social media. Today’s hypercompetitive ethos is not limited to brands or ads. Consumers want to know about the latest trends in fashion and technology, and they want to know first. By following brands, users can keep tabs on the latest and greatest.

Following also allows consumers to interact with brands more directly and to voice their dissatisfaction when brands misstep. A full 46 percent of users have “called out” brands on social media, and four out of five believe that this has had a positive impact on brand accountability. The good news for brands is that when they respond well, 45 percent of users will post about the interaction, and over a third will share the experience with their friends.

Brands should note that 60 percent of callouts are in response to perceived dishonesty, which should lend some context to the fact that 30 percent will unfollow a brand that uses slang or jargon inconsistent with the brand’s image. This can be a costly mistake, as 76 percent of users aged 13 to 25 stopped buying from brands after unfollowing.

The news may seem bleak, but the truth is that these facts draw a clear path for brands that want to tap into the unprecedented consumer access offered by the social media revolution. Here are some tips to keep in mind.

1. Be authentic

Above all, brands need to strive for authenticity. Consumers have shown that they are not only open to branded social media content, they welcome it, provided the content is useful and relevant rather than disruptive to their experience.

From social media usage statistics, we see that users are most interested in staying connected and entertained. Brands that share news of upcoming trends or offer content that stands on its own merit can add value to users’ social media experience while reaching out to a more receptive audience.

2. Be useful

Understanding how individuals utilize their…Continue reading

Article source: https://marketingland.com/8-tips-getting-social-media-ads-right-230908