U.S. dairy exports create jobs, spur innovation

Dairy Foods, Dairy Exports, Dairy Trade
Photo for Dairy Foods by Vito Palmisano
Tom Vilsack    June 6, 2017   Dairy Foods

 

The negative repercussions from Canada’s ongoing defiance of its trade obligations are a stark reminder of the critical role exports play in the health and vitality of the U.S. dairy industry.

Over the long term, U.S. milk production is rising faster than domestic demand and will likely continue to do so. Since 2003, nearly half of “new” milk produced in this country has gone to markets beyond our borders.

Dairy exports annually contribute about $15 billion to the U.S. economy, supporting 42,000 U.S. dairy farmers, 100,000 good-paying jobs and countless businesses that provide inputs all along the dairy supply chain. To sustain the benefits that exports bring to this nation, exports need to grow.

What do I mean when I say grow?

The staff at the U.S. Dairy Export Council analyzed U.S. dairy capabilities, global demand expectations and the capacity of competitors to meet the expanding and evolving needs of overseas buyers. Over the last four years, U.S. dairy export volume has averaged the equivalent of about 15% of the U.S. milk supply. We believe we can grow that number to 20% — or as we say at USDEC, “The Next 5%.”

Demand will be there

Population gains and middle class expansion will continue to drive global dairy consumption in emerging markets at a faster pace than domestic dairy industries can match.

Over the next 15 years, Asia’s middle class alone will grow by 2.7 billion people, from about 525 million today to 3.2 billion, which is about 10 times the total current population of the United States.

There is incredible opportunity for U.S. dairy processors and producers with those middle class consumers. USDEC estimates rising consumer demand will increase globally traded milk powder and dry whey volumes by more than 1 million tons by 2021. Demand for other dairy ingredients — milk protein concentrate, lactose and specialized products like lactoferrin and alpha-lactalbumin — will rise by more than 100,000 tons.

On the cheese side, demand for natural cheese at foodservice and retail (as well as pizza and other cheese types) will raise global cheese trade by more than 500,000 tons by 2021.

An ample, rising milk supply and a competitive, evolving product portfolio put the U.S. dairy industry in position to capture significant shares of those additional ingredient and cheese volumes. Backed by rigorous quality and safety standards, U.S. suppliers have made investments in products, people and plants. They have strengthened customer-centric relationships, aiming to cultivate long-term global supply and innovation partnerships.

For USDEC’s part, we plan to focus on three areas to help deliver The Next 5%.There are many facets to each strategy, but briefly:

  • Increasing demand includes supporting research into dairy nutrition and communicating positive health links to consumers, governments and aid organizations to buttress consumption. The more we can facilitate the understanding of milk’s benefits and the enjoyment of dairy products here and abroad, the more consumers will gravitate toward dairy. It is particularly important to address younger people to improve the chances that they will continue to utilize milk and dairy products as they age.
  • Facilitating sales focuses on making it easier for…Continue reading

Article source: http://www.dairyfoods.com/articles/92315-us-dairy-exports-create-jobs-spur-innovation

Advertisements

DiGiorno pizza used facial recognition to show how much people love pizza

screen-shot-2017-05-03-at-11-43-13-am-3

by Tanya Dua
Digiday

Everyone loves pizza — or, at least, that’s what DiGiorno wants to prove.

The Nestlé frozen pizza brand recently used facial recognition and emotion tracking software to measure people’s reactions to pizza. For the stunt, DiGiorno enlisted 24 everyday people to host three separate parties with friends and family at a loft in New York City.

At each of the parties, more than 40 high-resolution cameras were installed to use facial recognition and emotion-tracking software to gauge guests’ reactions. The footage was then processed using custom software to map the attendees’ expressions in response to the pizza’s smell and sight.

The recorded video footage was broken down to images at five-second intervals, and then processed through the facial analysis software. People’s emotional patterns — including joy, sorrow, anger, fear and surprise — were calculated with Google’s Vision API on a scale of 0-4. The joy scores were averaged on a per minute basis (only by participants that displayed it) and subtracted from the initial level of joy that they felt upon arriving at the party to calculate the joy they felt in reaction to each stimulus.

The results showed that at each…Continue reading

Article source: https://digiday.com/marketing/digiorno-pizza-used-facial-recognition-show-much-people-love-pizza/
Original Post dated May 3, 2017