No Marketing Budget? No Problem. Grow Your Business Using These 5 Tactics

Writing, Marketing, Business
Image credit: boonchoke/Shutterstock

Promoting your business can seem daunting when you have little or no budget for marketing. Fortunately, there are many marketing strategies that are easy to try and that are free.

You’ve built a great product or perhaps opened a sleek, new store – everything is ready. The big question, however, is do your potential customers know that you exist?

One of the hardest aspects of starting a business is acquiring customers. Marketing is the practice of telling potential customers about your business and educating them about what you do until they become a customer. Traditionally, marketing involved expensive TV commercials and billboard ads. Further adding to the challenge is that these marketing tactics are difficult to measure and change. Once you spend thousands of dollars on a billboard, you can’t rip it down every week to make adjustments.

Luckily, the new age of marketing has introduced novel strategies that anyone can start with, and, best of all, they are free. That’s right: You can start marketing your product or service today with a budget of $0.

Let’s examine some of the best free tactics to try.

Content

In the old days, marketing was about “pushing” information to your target audience. Today, so many marketing messages are pushed on people that this tactic has become harder to pull off. Instead, savvy marketers use pull tactics to bring the target market to you. One of the most effective ways to execute pull marketing is through content.

Content refers to valuable information online – e-books, blog posts, infographics, etc. – that provide value to your target audience. Ideally, the content matches what your potential customers might be searching for on Google. For example, if you are starting a meal kit delivery service, you might create a well-designed guide titled “5 Delicious Recipes You Can Cook in 30 Minutes.” People who are searching for recipes may also be interested in a meal kit.

The goal of your content is not to advertise. Instead, it is to educate. Your content needs to provide value to your potential customers, and they may read several articles on your blog (or e-books) before making a purchase.

Keep in mind, content strategy takes a long time and requires a lot of work. You need to be writing every day. You may need a graphic designer to help. If you can write and design yourself, then starting to market with content won’t cost you a dime!

Social media

In the mid-2000s, social media exploded as a new marketing frontier. People were purchasing smartphones and using new social networks like Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn. Today, these products are more mature and billions of people use them every day. As a result, social media has become wildly popular for advertising. You can start using social media platforms to engage your target audience for free. Here are some examples of what you can do:

  • If you’re a restaurant, post delicious food photos on Instagram.
  • If you’re a B2B software company, post how-to guides on LinkedIn.
  • If you’re a new product for moms, post childcare tips on Twitter and Pinterest.

Each social media platform appeals to different types of people; it’s important to research where your target customers spend the most time online. For example, you will find more business buyers on LinkedIn rather than Snapchat, but if you’re selling a product for teenagers, snap away.

Creating accounts and posting on social media is completely free. If you create compelling posts with stories and photos, you can certainly build a following without a budget.

Referrals

The best marketing is organic. This means you don’t have to do any additional work to get each new customer. Instead, your customers market the product for you. This typically happens through referrals: Customers tell their friends about your product. It could mean a customer inviting a friend to your restaurant because they tried it and liked it, or, perhaps, a customer is using your software and told a colleague about how helpful it was.

To make a referral program work, be sure you incorporate the following elements in your program:

  • Make it easy: Have a button on your website for people to share and invite friends.
  • Offer an incentive: Reward customers that refer the most individuals; perhaps the incentive could be a one-time discount.
  • Congratulate success: Whenever a customer refers someone, reach out to thank them.
  • Always ask: Don’t expect people to make referrals automatically. Respectfully ask.

Webinars

Webinars are online presentations where you teach listeners about a topic of interest. They have become incredibly popular and cost a fraction compared to a presentation at a trade show or other venue. Your potential customers from anywhere in the world can dial in and watch the webinar.

To create a good webinar, identify a topic that your potential customers might want to learn about. Create a presentation with slides and perhaps invite other experts (or one of your customers) to co-host the webinar with you. This will encourage them to promote it to their network and help you grow.

Webinars typically require a software program like GoToWebinar to host. Aside from this, there are no other costs, except your time.

Press

Getting press can be an incredible way to get highly impactful, free marketing. In the early days, the best way to get press is to have a remarkable product or service. If your store has a unique product, or your software does something cool and new, it will attract attention from the media, who, in turn, want to write an interesting article for their readers.

If you are starting a local business, reach out to nearby publications to announce a grand opening special. Pitch them a compelling story about why you started your business. If you are building something that is not location-specific, you can contact bloggers and small publications to see if any would be interested in telling your story.

It can take a long time to build relationships with publications. The first step is to establish yourself as an expert in your industry by writing quality content, as noted earlier. As a result, you will have more credibility in the eyes of the press, and thus more opportunity to have your stories published.

Article source: https://www.business.com/articles/free-marketing-tactics/

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5 Ways Smart Marketers Increase Revenue using Social Media

Social Media, Writing, Marketing
Image source: martechadvisor.com

 Disha Dinesh Content Marketer, Godot Media

Social media marketing can be used for so much more than just engagement. With the right strategies and social media tools, you can increase revenue for your business using social media platforms writes, Disha Dinesh, Content Marketer, Godot Media 

Every company has a presence on social media because it’s great for engagement. But clients today like to speak in terms of ROI. Budgets are tight, marketing options are many and clients don’t want to invest in marketing activities unless they are certain to provide substantial returns.

According to a recent study, 93% customers expect companies to have a presence on social media and 71 % of them are willing to make a purchase from the brands that they follow on social media.

However, driving conversions via social media can be tricky because you need the right mix of content, promotion strategies and social media tools. Here’s an insight into what smart marketers do to increase revenue using social media.

  1. Drive referrals to your website using social media

When you create and promote social media content, referrals should be at the top of your mind, because you can’t drive or track conversions without referrals. In addition to this, yo should also ensure that the landing page your drive referrals to should be optimized for conversion.

One simple way to greatly increase social media referrals is to create automated publishing queues of your best converting content.

There are several social media management tools such as DrumUp (full disclosure, I work with them), that you can use for such an activity. Personally, I save high-referral blog posts, external mentions and top performing social posts in DrumUp’s libraries and set those libraries on automatic publishing schedules. I add new posts to these libraries everyday, as new blog posts get published. This activity has greatly boosted our social media referrals.

  1. Attract your audience with relevant content

It doesn’t matter if you have a million social media fans; you won’t get business from them unless you there’re relevant to your business and you actually engage them. That’s why it’s critical to choose the content that you share on your social accounts very carefully.

One of the easiest ways to find great content to share is through content curation apps such as Pocket. This app can also serve as a great source for content inspiration when you’re writing marketing content.

To make the most of Pocket, I have setup my fields of interest on the app, and go to it when I’m suffering from writer’s block, or I need fresh content to share with my social media followers. Pocket also lets you save posts from the internet and tag them for easy access when needed.

  1. Collect leads using social media

When you drive referral from social media, instead of directly converting the referrals, you could turn them into leads. This is especially advisable if you have a business with a typically long sales cycle. Each lead you collect from social media can go into your regular sales funnel.

The simplest ways to collect leads from social media is to direct social media traffic to a page that collects emails for your newsletter opt-in or a giveaway.

You need an email capture tool to collect emails from social media visitors. SumoMe offers website analytics and email capture forms that are quite easy to use. We’ve set up a standard email capture form that works quite well for us. Alternatively, you could also directly generate leads from social media using a tool like Socedo.

  1. Run promotions on social media

When creating campaign creatives, it’s important to consider using largely visual elements with less text, because Facebook is very crowded and visuals are more likely to be noticed on crowded feeds than is text.

You can also supplement social media promotions with social media ads and email newsletter promotions, which increase your promotion referrals.

Many small businesses run promotions on Facebook. If your promotion ideas abide by Facebook’s guidelines, you can be certain that they’re safe to run on the social media platform. However, running promotions on Facebook requires a third-party app. Apps such as WildFireApp are great options.

  1. Use social media for PR

The cost of PR can drastically drop if you use your social media networks to achieve your PR goals. And there are several ways that you could use social media for PR. According to a recent study, 57.5% consumers are likely to make a purchase from brands that they follow on social media. Social media PR is a great way to appeal to these consumers.

The simplest way to do PR on social media is by collaborating with other brands. You could begin by guest curating content for other brands or guest posting on their blogs. Getting C-suite executives or influencers to publish social media posts is another way to drive PR goals using social media.

Identifying PR opportunities on social media can be tough, without a social media listening tool like BrandWatch. With social media listening, you can set-up keywords and listen for potential PR opportunities on social media.

Article source: https://www.martechadvisor.com/articles/social-media-marketing-2/5-ways-smart-marketers-increase-revenue-using-social-media/

Tall Tales: 3 Online Men’s Retailers Using Lifestyle Content to Engage Customers

e-commerce, retail, menswear, influencer marketing
Image source: skyword.com

By Shannon O’Neill | Skyword

While some e-commerce retailers are turning to pop-up locations to engage with consumers, popular online men’s retailers like Mr Porter, Huckberry, and Best Made Co. are taking a different approach to influencer marketing, connecting to their customers through lifestyle content in the form of travel and adventure stories and even fashion tips.

Men Shop Differently

According to a study by IBISWorld and shared by Quartz, more men than ever are shopping online and online menswear shopping is projected to grow faster than other e-commerce verticals, beating out even computers for the top spot. Between 2010 and 2015, men’s online clothing sales grew by 17.4 percent, compared to computers and tablets at 11.4 percent.

Graph of Men's Online Shopping Habits

“The top way apparel shoppers like retailers to communicate with them is via email and the best way for menswear retailers to connect with male shoppers is to customize their email campaigns,” explained Eric Feinberg, VP of marketing at ForeSee, a voice-of-customer company, in an interview with CPC Strategy.

Not only do men shop differently than women, says Feinberg, women are more likely to be motivated by sales, while men are motivated by content. That difference, in turn, can influence loyalty: “Bought loyalty is coupon-driven, instant gratification for a retailer—it feels good. Earned loyalty results in lifetime value, but it takes longer. It requires more content, nurturing, education, and differentiation.”

Show, Don’t Tell

When it comes to building a relationship with content and education, Mr Porter was early to the game with magazine-style articles to engage with their customers. Launched as the modern, stylish men’s version of women’s fashion and accessories retailer Net-a-Porter and geared toward a high-end luxury consumer who prefers Tod’s to Toms, Mr Porter customers still spend time reading fashion and lifestyle advice articles, watching video content, and keeping up with their online magazine, The Journal.

“We knew we had to create a men’s world that didn’t seem too fashiony,” Jeremy Langmead, brand and content director at Mr Porter, told the Wall Street Journal in 2016. His experience as a former editor-in-chief of the longstanding men’s lifestyle bible Esquire informed not only their editorial direction but the direction of the company overall. The site’s most popular articles tend to be the how-tos, like How To Trade Up Your Skinny Jeans For Wide-Leg Pants.” But the lifestyle section covers everything from cooking to work life, much more like a magazine than a sales promotion. Stylish and aspirational content is the goal, from the helpful “Holiday-Booking Hacks from the Experts” to the thought-provoking “The End of Sharing Dishes.”

Mr Porter The Journal

“With women, you can say, ‘the Celine bag is the must-have bag of the season,’ but if you say something to that effect to a guy, you’ll just a get a blank stare,” Langmead explained to GQ. “Five different ways you can wear something, where you can wear something—it’s about facts and practicality. It’s more information than inspiration.”

Whatever it is, it’s working. According to the WSJ piece, Mr Porter’s typical customer spent around five minutes reading articles and other content before shopping, where they spent on average of eight to ten minutes selecting purchases.

When it comes to online shopping, companies like outdoor and lifestyle brand Best Made Co. are not afraid to engage with this desire. Founder Peter Buchanan-Smith, a former art director who felt the need to be outside more, started Best Made Co. as a workshop, but soon turned it into a catalog-driven business.

“My love is storytelling, and a print catalog is one of the best and least expected places to tell stories,” Buchanan-Smith recently told Forbes. “Catalogs have become so product driven, formulaic, and transactional. We are giving our customers a much more meaningful experience.”

Best Made Co Adventure Series

With stories told in beautifully shot, high-quality, large-format photo slideshows, the result is akin to visiting a friend who has just had the most amazing trip to Belize. In a sense, it’s influencer marketing done by individuals who are marketing their own lifestyle. In addition to products, the company also offers actual adventures, trips, and workshops at their NYC and LA locations (like knife-sharpening or indigo-dying). Best Made Co. is not just selling an experience, it’s literally selling an adventure. Their story resonates because it is true to their aesthetic and purpose—get outside, learn and do things, survive—not just a slick maneuver to purchase their products.

Social Influencers Impact Buying

One reason that adventure and lifestyle content is connecting is most likely due to a generational shift in how men engage with fashion. The second reason is pretty simple—men take fashion tips from other men.

According to a 2016 Boutique@Ogilvy Men’s Shopping Report, millennial men are more likely to take tips from friends, Instagram, or celebrities when it comes to inspiration for fashion. By comparison, 18 percent of millennial men favored Instagram, compared to only 4 percent of gen Xers and 0 percent of baby boomers.

As more and more influencers dominate social feeds, they bring their fashion sense with them. “Digital media and a constant stream of imagery of stylish iconic men—from successful entrepreneurs to funny YouTube personalities—have encouraged the socialization of men’s fashion,” Tammy Smulders, global managing director of LuxHub, a division of Havas Media Group, told Digiday. “Social media and being ‘always on’ has made it so that everyday men have become more focused on their look.”

When it comes to lifestyle and influencer marketing, Huckberry’s combination of retail and lifestyle inspiration makes you forget that you even came to this place for clothes. The company defines itself as “an online shop and journal that inspires more active, adventurous, and stylish lives through members-only sales, original story-telling, and unique experiences,” and their site does just that. The journal offers the men’s guide of how-tos and Q&As, but they also have a highly cultivated influencer community of “ambassadors” and “artists” with whom they collaborate on products and ask to tell their own adventure and craft stories.

Huckberry Journal

Rather than just having a community of influencers, the site shows you the community of customers who are seemingly living the lifestyle that the brand is selling—creative, adventurous, and willing to spend money on well-crafted products. With a strong Instagram presence, the ambassadors and artists allow the Huckberry story to spread and increase its audience.

Like the retail catalog giants before them (think L.L. Bean or J. Crew), these brands are selling a lifestyle story: You too can be adventurous or stylish and learn how to live this story (and BTW, please wear our products). Whether through newsletters, online journals, social media, or email campaigns, they are tapping into a market of male consumers who are increasingly ready to be influenced.

Article source: https://www.skyword.com/contentstandard/creativity/tall-tales-3-online-mens-retailers-using-lifestyle-content-to-engage-customers/

How Kate Spade is building an entertainment-driven content strategy

Kate Spade, Video, Social Media, Influencer
An image from Kate Spade’s ‘Make Yourself a Home’ YouTube series

By  |The Drum

About five years ago, Kate Spade found itself facing many of the same issues as other fashion brands. With glossy two-page magazine ads continuing to lose their luster, the handbag maker was struggling to shed its more traditional, print-oriented ways and create a digital strategy that worked.

Speaking at SXSW, Kate Spade’s chief marketing officer Mary Beech explained that at the time, the brand was employing a hollow one-size-fits-all approach to social by posting the same content on each platform. Additionally, the company was struggling to glean any real insights from the data it had on hand.

“We created content for all of the various mediums in which we were on, but we created one piece of content and just pushed it across all the mediums, not taking into any account what was specific about those distribution techniques,” said Beech. “We had lots of data, but we didn’t have insights, and so we weren’t using those insights to leverage them against the content we created and deployed.”

Fast forward to 2018, and the brand – which was acquired by Coach last year for $2.4bn – is doing things a bit differently. Through creating content that’s both platform-specific and entertainment-driven, the New York-based company has managed to create a digital strategy that it says is helping it connect and engage with fans.

Finding a story to tell

Getting into a “video-first” mindset is something that Kristen Naiman, senior vice president of brand creative at Kate Spade’s in-house agency, wanted to prioritize when she joined the company four years ago. At the time, Naiman said her team was “very stuck in thinking about the photograph” as the main form of communication.

To move away from that, her team began looking at what sorts of shows and series were popular to see if the brand could take any cues from the entertainment world.

“A lot of what was happening out there that felt really exciting was this renaissance of serialized narrative storytelling content,” she said, pointing to shows like HBO’s High Maintenance and the rising popularly of Netflix. It was around that same time that female comedians like Lena Dunham and Amy Schumer were beginning to see their careers skyrocket, something she said the brand also took note of since she believed they were helping to usher in a new era of comedy.

“We thought both of those things were amazing and really interesting,” said Naiman.

Those two insights led to the birth of Kate Spade’s #MissAdventure, a short-form YouTube show starring actress and singer Anna Kendrick that kicked off in 2014. In the series, Kendrick plays a slightly ditzy, quirky woman who spends her days exploring New York.

“Our principles were twofold: we were going to make something that behaved in a way that was digital-first, and we were going to make something that while it was meant to be a piece of marketing to a certain degree, was interesting first,” said Naiman.

Kate Spade’s products were tied into the series via a concept Naiman calls “product as character,” which essentially involves making a product an integral part of the story rather than something a character is simply wearing or using.

For instance, in an episode of #MissAdventure called ‘The Waiting Game,’ Kendrick realizes she’s lost her apartment keys once she arrives at her doorstep. To get in, she decides to create a makeshift rope using the Kate Spade clothes and shoes she’s just bought so she can climb in via the fire escape.

Naiman said making the brand’s products a “distinct element” in the stories it tells helps the brand become part of the narrative, a strategy she believes is more effective than simply sticking a logo at the end of a video.

“We are a materialist culture. We all live with a lot of stuff in our lives, and those elements in our lives are part of our story,” she said.

Choosing a platform

While some brands strive to be early adopters and try out every new platform, Kate Spade has taken a more cautious approach to social.

Krista Neuhaus, Kate Spade’s senior director of digital brand marketing, said the brand was on every single social channel when she joined a few years back. Upon joining, she made it her job to figure out not only which channels the brand should be on and which ones it shouldn’t, but also how it should approach each individual platform…Read more 

Article source: http://www.thedrum.com/news/2018/03/12/how-kate-spade-building-entertainment-driven-content-strategy

A journalist’s 12 tips to writing good content

Writing, Content
A journalist’s guide to writing good content / Thought Catalog

By  | The Drum Network

Good writing isn’t easy, nor should it be. The fact that every man and his dog thinks he can write these days only serves to make the role of writers more important – with a real need for people to write quality content that stands out from the mediocre morass.

However, even the best writers get writer’s block and it’s easy to get stuck in a rut. In that spirit, here are 12 things I learned as a journalist that I’ve taken into marketing. Hopefully they can aid you in your quest to fine tune your writing.

  1. Read widely: The more you read, the better a writer you become. Look at your competitors – but also become a voracious reader of blogs, websites, newspapers, magazines and books. Good writers ‘magpie’ ideas from a variety of sources.
  2. Keep it simple: Journalists are encouraged to consider whether their parents or grandparents would understand their copy, stripping away unnecessary jargon and explaining terminology. Always consider if your audience would understand what you’ve written and use short, sharp sentences without too many clauses to avoid confusion.
  3. Be active: Think of the loose formula ‘subject, verb, object’. So, ‘Andrew wrote a rant for The Drum’ is probably better than ‘The rant came in an article written by Andrew’. Don’t be constrained by this rule but keep it in mind to write punchy content.
  4. Bullet point lists: Google loves a bullet point list – and so does your reader. Use them to make your content digestible.
  5. Use a thesaurus: Avoid using the same word more than once in a sentence. A thesaurus is your friend.
  6. Become self-reflective: Read back over posts you’ve written, preferably after a week or more has passed. Learn to critique your content and see what has and hasn’t worked.
  7. Write for pleasure: Writers who keep their love for their craft will give you that little bit extra. Write a blog about your personal passion in your free time and the process of writing will never become a chore.
  8. Listen to others: Good writers observe the world around them and channel their observations through the written word. Listening carefully to others will especially help if you write for an audience you aren’t part of.
  9. Don’t be too precious: People will disagree with you as a writer. They’ll often fuss about one or two words. You need a thick skin. Don’t be upset by the one word you were forced to change, be proud of the hundreds of others that are published.
  10. Challenge your brief: If you’re writing something and it feels wrong, it probably is. If you’re bored or confused by what you’re writing, then you can expect your reader to feel the same. Be prepared to question what’s in your brief.
  11. Write it how you’d say it: Are you stuck? Think about what you would say if you were to explain this verbally. Maybe write this out and then turn those words into something that’s more appropriate in a written form.
  12. Talk to other writers: A good team spirit and open dialogue between writers is important. Writers can help each other through difficulties by suggesting possible solutions or maybe offering links to articles they’ve read or written for inspiration.

This article first appeared as a chapter in volume two of The Ultimate Guide to Blogging for Your Brand. 

Article source: http://www.thedrum.com/opinion/2018/02/13/journalists-12-tips-writing-good-content

TV May Affect the Brain, But Influencer Marketing Affects the Heart

Marketing, Advertising, Social Media
Image Credit: valentinrussanov/iStock
By  | Adweek

Marketing and advertising have evolved in many ways over the past decade, particularly with the ways we consume media, most notably social media.

The advent of social media has ushered in a new wave of creators— the talented individuals who have showcased their creativity and developed a following around their content.

Enter influencer marketing—one of the fastest-growing segments of marketing—a new and exciting way to bring your brand to life. The big question that always remains is: “How do I measure the impact of my marketing programs?”

The #paid team decided to tackle this challenge by working with the team at Nielsen Consumer Insights on a marketing effectiveness study to better understand the consumer impact of branded influencer marketing materials, specifically reviewing the creative campaign of a major food and beverage brand.

To accomplish this, Nielsen conducted an online study to:

  • Evaluate the effectiveness of influencer marketing on key performance indicators (recall, affinity, etc.).
  • Assess the attributes associated with each piece of content (unique, credible, cool, etc.).
  • Determine the impact of influencer marketing on future purchase decisions.

As a basis of comparison, the team wanted to establish a benchmark against the primary channel for brand-based marketing—video advertising and TV commercials—by using a pre- and post-exposure methodology, often used by Nielsen Media Lab. The published study can be found on the #paid website.

The results were surprising but insightful into the ways consumers view these different types of content. The research showed that video advertising performed extremely well on brand recall and driving brand awareness. However, social media content drove stronger brand perception shifts, and content quality was viewed as equivalent or greater than traditional video ads.

So, what does that mean for influencer marketing? These are some of the major takeaways from the study:

Influencer marketing and TV work in complementary ways

Many marketers view these two investments as an “either/or,” essentially creating a divide between the two channels. In the end, the research revealed the various impacts of marketing and how they actually work best simultaneously.

When consumers see a TV ad, they see the brand logo, product shot, key claims and tagline. Catchy jingles can get stuck in people’s minds. All of this works well to get people to notice and remember a brand, but this is only the first step within the path to purchase.

Influencer marketing takes this a step further by integrating products into the creators’ lives that consumers seek inspiration from and relate to. In short, creators make products highly relatable and desirable. These attributes have been shown to increase consideration and purchase intent—the next stage of the path to purchase.

Content can be produced—at scale—from social media creators

Marketers should look at how we develop creative content in the 21st century. It doesn’t require pricey studio rentals, a production crew, casting talent and editing anymore. All of these tasks are performed by content creators—the 21st century production crew.

Initial concerns about the quality of the content were put at ease when the results showed that content quality was actually viewed as equivalent or exceeding that of the traditional video ad.

Tools to measure the impact of influencer marketing are becoming more abundant

Measuring the impact of brand marketing has always been an elusive and tricky thing to figure out. The ways we measure the impact can vary depending on the type of campaign that’s run, the objectives set out and the conversion funnel.

That said, establishing campaign goals and running brand measurement studies or any conversion analysis are excellent ways to track the performance of influencer marketing and determine the brand’s return on investment.

When traditional research leaders like Nielsen partner with brand teams, agencies and industry innovators on finding new ways to measure the impact of new approaches to marketing, the industry wins. It allows all marketers to understand the different use cases and make everybody’s efforts stronger.

Authenticity and relatable at its core

A strength in influencer marketing stems from its ability for brands to partner with creators that develop content perceived to be authentic and relatable to their audience. Their audience has come to know them for an extended period of time, heard their reviews on a range of different products and services and see a bit of themselves in the creators they follow.

When a creator voices their opinion and integrates a brand into their feed, it connects to their audience in a much more powerful way than simply getting a video view or an ad impression.

Influencer marketing should be considered a key part of a marketer’s tool kit

While influencer marketing programs can be led by different teams—PR, creative, media or the brand—the simple story is that influencer marketing is here to stay and deserves significant investment and coordination within a brand plan.

When the #paid team works on various influencer marketing programs, they either partner with brands directly or with their media agencies, as they often hold the media budgets. Those budgets are crucial in order to ensure the scalable success of influencer marketing: Creators deserve to get compensated for their work, time and talent; brand teams need to ensure that content is created on time and according to the brief.

All in all, the future of influencer marketing is bright. Influencer marketing budgets continue to rise, creators are learning how to integrate brands in a more sophisticated and authentic way and the industry as a whole is adopting best practices to drive even more value for everybody involved.

Article source: http://www.adweek.com/digital/richard-wong-paid-guest-post-influencer-marketing/

The anatomy of the modern marketer

marketing
Image source: thedrum.com

By 

What does the future of marketing look like? Last year, MOI Global undertook a six-month project to find out. Consisting of three global dinner discussions, a survey and top marketing thought leadership from some frankly badass panelists and speakers, Disrupt Forum 2017 uncovered many of the answers.

We started by dissecting the anatomy of the modern marketer. Today’s buyer has all the power, and any marketer who wants to redress the balance needs to adopt a new way of thinking. But no marketer is an island. And no single skill set will do. Instead, both MOI’s Anatomy of the Modern Marketer survey and the panellists from our first Disrupt Forum dinner revealed the key characteristics we should identify, promote and nurture in the Modern Marketer.

Future-focused

Sitting alongside a readiness to learn and to adapt is a hunger to improve. Many of today’s marketers choose opportunity and corporate fit over cash reward, and are aware of how their development and progression helps the business. This means they are focused on organisational goals, alongside their own.

Multifaceted marketing

Marketing is no longer a single discipline, but multifaceted. The Modern Marketer is part scientist, part creative, and while technology has brought the need for a whole new set of digital skills, traditional marketing skills are as relevant and crucial as ever: the need to understand data, finance, and to build a strategy, hook an audience…

Collaborative

Hook an audience. Isn’t that old-school in this age of inbound marketing and user-generated content (UGC)? Well you need to inspire and compel them to collaborate with you in the first place, or why would they bother? And collaboration skills are key internally too – 78% of marketers who took our survey chose ‘collaborator’ as the most important personality trait. Marketers who can work with and learn from other functions will have a broader perspective and a bigger ideas pool.

Curious

Perhaps the most important trait of all in an ever-changing world is curiosity. “Stay hungry,” says Disrupt Forum panelist Geraldine Kor, director of marketing, DXC. “If you are constantly hungry, you’ll always be curious and be seeking.” The ‘Modern Marketer’ is always alert to new trends and opportunities, always seeking new ways of doing things, always ready to listen, learn and adapt.

Customer-obsessed

The best marketers put understanding customers at the heart of their marketing, obsessing not just about who and where they are, but also their attitudes, behaviours and actions. They understand that the customer experience they provide is what differentiates their company from the rest.

So what did we learn? As hard as we tried to find it, there’s no single set of skills, training course or process today that will remain fit for purpose for very long. But for marketers not daunted by change, there’s a world of opportunities.

Article source: http://www.thedrum.com/opinion/2018/01/08/the-anatomy-the-modern-marketer