U.S. dairy exports create jobs, spur innovation

Dairy Foods, Dairy Exports, Dairy Trade
Photo for Dairy Foods by Vito Palmisano
Tom Vilsack    June 6, 2017   Dairy Foods

 

The negative repercussions from Canada’s ongoing defiance of its trade obligations are a stark reminder of the critical role exports play in the health and vitality of the U.S. dairy industry.

Over the long term, U.S. milk production is rising faster than domestic demand and will likely continue to do so. Since 2003, nearly half of “new” milk produced in this country has gone to markets beyond our borders.

Dairy exports annually contribute about $15 billion to the U.S. economy, supporting 42,000 U.S. dairy farmers, 100,000 good-paying jobs and countless businesses that provide inputs all along the dairy supply chain. To sustain the benefits that exports bring to this nation, exports need to grow.

What do I mean when I say grow?

The staff at the U.S. Dairy Export Council analyzed U.S. dairy capabilities, global demand expectations and the capacity of competitors to meet the expanding and evolving needs of overseas buyers. Over the last four years, U.S. dairy export volume has averaged the equivalent of about 15% of the U.S. milk supply. We believe we can grow that number to 20% — or as we say at USDEC, “The Next 5%.”

Demand will be there

Population gains and middle class expansion will continue to drive global dairy consumption in emerging markets at a faster pace than domestic dairy industries can match.

Over the next 15 years, Asia’s middle class alone will grow by 2.7 billion people, from about 525 million today to 3.2 billion, which is about 10 times the total current population of the United States.

There is incredible opportunity for U.S. dairy processors and producers with those middle class consumers. USDEC estimates rising consumer demand will increase globally traded milk powder and dry whey volumes by more than 1 million tons by 2021. Demand for other dairy ingredients — milk protein concentrate, lactose and specialized products like lactoferrin and alpha-lactalbumin — will rise by more than 100,000 tons.

On the cheese side, demand for natural cheese at foodservice and retail (as well as pizza and other cheese types) will raise global cheese trade by more than 500,000 tons by 2021.

An ample, rising milk supply and a competitive, evolving product portfolio put the U.S. dairy industry in position to capture significant shares of those additional ingredient and cheese volumes. Backed by rigorous quality and safety standards, U.S. suppliers have made investments in products, people and plants. They have strengthened customer-centric relationships, aiming to cultivate long-term global supply and innovation partnerships.

For USDEC’s part, we plan to focus on three areas to help deliver The Next 5%.There are many facets to each strategy, but briefly:

  • Increasing demand includes supporting research into dairy nutrition and communicating positive health links to consumers, governments and aid organizations to buttress consumption. The more we can facilitate the understanding of milk’s benefits and the enjoyment of dairy products here and abroad, the more consumers will gravitate toward dairy. It is particularly important to address younger people to improve the chances that they will continue to utilize milk and dairy products as they age.
  • Facilitating sales focuses on making it easier for…Continue reading

Article source: http://www.dairyfoods.com/articles/92315-us-dairy-exports-create-jobs-spur-innovation

The Six Departments of Innovation

Machine Design, Technology, Innovation
Image Source: machinedesign.com
Does your company need to rebalance innovation organizations?

Bradford Goldense | May 23, 2017

For the past decade, which translates into two to five product cycles for most industries, broad-based innovation has been on the decline. The research of Dr. Robert Cooper, the creator of Stage-Gate, indicates that companies typically spent almost 60% of R&D funds on New-to-the-World, New-to-the-Market, and New Product Lines. The remaining 40% went to Additions to Existing Product Lines and Improvements to Existing Products. These figures are now inverted. Most companies now focus on extending the life of existing products and assets, and they will until GDP clearly outpaces inflation again. There are now indications that top-line pressures may lessen in a year. Let’s get a jump on likely good news by revisiting the alternatives companies have to spur innovation.

Just about everything companies do to innovate falls into six groups: Basic Research, Applied Research, Advanced Development, Product Development, Product Enhancement, and Product Invention. The first five categories are a continuum of capabilities and/or technologies progressing from the nascent to the mature. Product Invention, aka Skunk Works and other names, spans nascent to mature by itself.

In Basic Research (BR), discovery targets are broad. Scientists and researchers look for capabilities that have “some efficacy” with an articulated broad market or targeted need. Some BR is truly blue sky, but that has decreased over the past few decades as few can afford it. BR often just rules out what won’t work and identifies technologies or capabilities that might work.

Applied Research (AR) typically has a more specific target. There is some known problem, opportunity, or application area in which there is a possible economic gain or social improvement. AR picks up by taking things that might work and attempts to narrow down the feasible technical alternatives.

Advanced Development (AD) takes the feasible technical alternatives and…Continue reading…

Article source: http://www.machinedesign.com/community/six-departments-innovation

Creativity Works: Innovation lives on the other side of fear

innovation, ideas, creativity, The Tucker, The Morning Call
Image Source: The Morning Call (A replica of the Tucker 48. The man who conceived the Tucker 48, Preston Tucker, was a true innovator who had his ideas rejected, writes columnist William Childs.)
William Childs William Childs Special to The Morning Call        May 23, 2017

What is it about creativity that frightens some people?

Why does anything innovative tend to be met with resistance?

Oscar Wilde once remarked, “An idea that is not dangerous is not worthy of being called an idea at all.” I think that an inherent bias against uncertainty and fear of the unknown is at the core of our trepidation when we get confronted with a new idea. For work to be truly creative and groundbreaking, it must depart from the status quo of what is known or accepted, and that’s where the challenge lies.

Innovation lives on the other side of fear.

You could fill an ocean with all the examples of people who had their brilliant ideas rejected. Preston Tucker, an American automobile designer, and entrepreneur who introduced a brand-new car design in 1948 was one such example. The car was so innovative when it was introduced, it sent the Big 3 automakers into a frenzy. The Tucker, as it was aptly named, was the first car ever to include seat belts. The engine was 150 horsepower with fuel injection and was placed in the rear of the car.

Another Tucker invention was the laminated windshield engineered to pop out during an accident, along with many other safety features. Instead of being celebrated, he was run out of business by unscrupulous individuals who were not ready for his type of forward-thinking.

They looked for any way they could…Continue reading

Article source: http://www.mcall.com/business/tech/mc-creativity-works-innovation-fear-20170523-story.html

 

People Who Believe in Ideas

an-idea-isnt-responsible-1024x767
Image Source: http://www.exaltus.ca

“An idea isn’t responsible for the people who believe in it.”
– Don Marquis

Ideas pop up all the time, whether they appear to be good or not so good. Yet, in order for an idea to become reality, those who believe in it will work tirelessly to make it happen.