Is Hyper-Reality a Real Life Threat?

Virtual Reality, Hyperreality, Augmented Reality, 3D Imagery

Have you ever gotten so caught up in watching a game or a video through virtual reality, that you were unable to consciously decipher whether it was real or not? There are several technological applications designed for play or entertainment that add new dimensions of digital components where the real and virtual worlds enhance each other. Such technology transports end-users into a new age of collaboration and thinking.

Virtual reality (VR), a common application and acronym we are familiar with, offers digital recreation of a real life setting. Typically VR headsets are very popular with gamers, entertainment, media, films, and design, by merging the power of 3-dimensional graphics in an artificial environment. Augmented reality (AR) provides virtual elements in a setting that overlay the real world. Mixed reality (MR) on the other hand, sometimes referred to as Hybrid reality (HR) merges and interrelate the real and virtual worlds, which reacts to each other in real-time environments and visualizations.

Leaders in the tech industry are doing some revolutionary things with motion-activated commands and holograms. VR and AR technology can possibly make a great impact on the medical field. While we are making quantum leaps between virtual, augmented and hybrid worlds, are we also experiencing cautionary symptoms of hyperreality? Hyperreality, a postmodern semiotic concept, coined by French Sociologist and Cultural Theorist, Jean Baudrillard, (according to his book, Simulacra and Simulation), explains a human condition in which the inability to consciously distinguish simulation from the real world really exists.

Technology is reflecting entertainment, reality, and function in radical ways. Of course, there are discussions from various non-tech individuals who seem to agree that addictions to simulated reality, particularly where young people are involved, sometimes gives evidence of real-time life encounters handled through the lens of the 3-D world. For example, kids may not truly understand the consequences resulting from the danger of handling an unsecured weapon and mimicking a VR fight scene that could have fatal consequences.

So what do you think? With such amazing software used to create entertainment for these devices, can hyperreality become such a threat that many gamers may not be able to logically distinguish hybrid reality from the real world?

 

Creativity Works: Innovation lives on the other side of fear

innovation, ideas, creativity, The Tucker, The Morning Call
Image Source: The Morning Call (A replica of the Tucker 48. The man who conceived the Tucker 48, Preston Tucker, was a true innovator who had his ideas rejected, writes columnist William Childs.)
William Childs William Childs Special to The Morning Call        May 23, 2017

What is it about creativity that frightens some people?

Why does anything innovative tend to be met with resistance?

Oscar Wilde once remarked, “An idea that is not dangerous is not worthy of being called an idea at all.” I think that an inherent bias against uncertainty and fear of the unknown is at the core of our trepidation when we get confronted with a new idea. For work to be truly creative and groundbreaking, it must depart from the status quo of what is known or accepted, and that’s where the challenge lies.

Innovation lives on the other side of fear.

You could fill an ocean with all the examples of people who had their brilliant ideas rejected. Preston Tucker, an American automobile designer, and entrepreneur who introduced a brand-new car design in 1948 was one such example. The car was so innovative when it was introduced, it sent the Big 3 automakers into a frenzy. The Tucker, as it was aptly named, was the first car ever to include seat belts. The engine was 150 horsepower with fuel injection and was placed in the rear of the car.

Another Tucker invention was the laminated windshield engineered to pop out during an accident, along with many other safety features. Instead of being celebrated, he was run out of business by unscrupulous individuals who were not ready for his type of forward-thinking.

They looked for any way they could…Continue reading

Article source: http://www.mcall.com/business/tech/mc-creativity-works-innovation-fear-20170523-story.html

 

Drones: Space Invaders?

Drones, Surveillance

Drones. These remote operated, propeller quadcopters can turn the sky into a creative canvas. Drones can be your aerial eyes when you are unable to physically get the different shots and angles you want to get. Drones can be equipped with high-powered cameras, infrared devices, microphones and many other high-tech tools.

At the same time we are applauding this advancement in technology, there are growing concerns about the safety, regulation, invasion of privacy and other illegal activities they are being used for. Yet one of the most problematic of concerns is from law enforcement. Helicopters and other aircraft are finding that these remote flyers are much too close for comfort within restricted airspace.

While many drone owners and operators follow state and federal guidelines, many owners and operators are not. Such safety concerns can pose a risk to legitimate aircraft operators. At the same time a drone can pose a threat to the safety of innocent bystanders below should a mid-air collision occur or if flight patterns are affected by a sudden shift in weather conditions like strong winds.

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has issued the latest regulations regarding policies, training, licenses, certifications, etc., to comply with rules regarding the operation of drones in a controlled airspace. Go to https://www.faa.gov/uas/ for more information from the United States Department of Transportation. Don’t let a violation interfere with your innovation.