Business As Usual Is A Death Trap

Business, Innovation
Image credit: InKnowvative Concepts

Be Innovative!

Business as usual is a death trap.
The ordinary has become hazardous.

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Lego shakes up imagination in unboxing spot

Lego, Imagination, Gifts, Presents
Image Source: thedrum.com

Shaking up a present is usual for a kid, so when they get one that has great shaking sounds to the max, they smile and dream of great things. Lego takes that concept to the extreme with a new holiday campaign — ‘Shake Up Imagination.’

Lego Systems, in a new unboxing spot by R/GA, demonstrates how the sound of Lego can spark imagination without even showing the product. Unsuspecting kids received unbranded, wrapped presents and were asked to guess what’s inside. They began shaking the gifts and recognized the iconic sound of Lego bricks. They then excitedly began imagining what they would build.

From double dinosaurs to flying boats, the brand showcased the magic of their product, just by the sound. “It goes from New York to the Bahamas,” said one child about his ambitions.

See the spot by clicking the Creative Works box below.

Lego, Imagination

Article Source: http://www.thedrum.com/news/2017/10/30/lego-shakes-up-imagination-unboxing-spot

Dubai International Airport will replace ID checks with a facial recognition aquarium

Dubai Airport, Technology, Facial Recognition, Innovation
Photo: Satish Kumar for The National

In a world in which people are increasingly willing to trade privacy for convenience, facial recognition seems to be a new frontier. And the foremost pioneers on that frontier now appear to be the folks at Dubai International Airport.

Airport officials plan to install a virtual tunnel-shaped aquarium equipped with 80 supposedly invisible cameras that will identify passengers as they walk through, in lieu of customs agents looking from your passport to your face and back. The first aquarium will be up and running by the end of next summer, according to The National. Emirates customers will be the first to experience the tunnel, but the airport plans to install more until 2020.

Facial recognition is popping up at more and more airports as a way to streamline the process of identifying passengers ahead of boarding, and it has its conveniences. You don’t have to remember your passport or driver’s license or other forms of ID, and the lines will theoretically move more quickly because people don’t have to stop and wait for an official to check those IDs.

Dubai’s aquariums seem to be taking the relaxation idea to a level no one else has thought of, but the aquariums serve a purpose other than to calm passengers as they head to their planes.

“The fish is a sort of entertainment and something new for the traveler but, at the end of the day, it attracts the vision of the travelers to different corners in the tunnel for the cameras to capture his/her face print,” Obaid Al Hameeri, the deputy director general of Dubai residency and foreign affairs, told The National.

The National reports that travelers will be able to register their faces at kiosks, and those scans will presumably be matched up with what the aquarium-tunnel cameras pick up as you pass through.

If the cameras determine you are who you say you are, you’ll get a green light at the end of the aquari-tunnel. If not, you’ll get a red light, and an official will likely conduct extra screening of some kind.

It’s not clear what Dubai airport officials will do with these face scans after they have them. Do they keep them on file, assuming you’ll return? Do they share this information with government officials in the United Arab Emirates? How about with officials in other countries?

And face scans are just part one of a two-part plan. Soon, these aquariums may also have cameras that scan your irises. Just remember that when you’re looking at all the pretty fish.

 

Via Verde Project: Fighting Pollution with Vertical Gardens in Mexico City

Green Way, Via Verde, Mexico City, Fighting Pollution, Clean Air
Image credit: TheCivilEngineer.org

Turning highway pillars into vertical gardens in order to fight pollution and beautify the cityscape is an innovative citizen-led initiative that Mexico City has implemented. Director and architect Fernando Ortiz Monasterio of the Via Verde Project in Mexico City noted that the main priority for creating these vertical gardens was to transform the city and can hopefully change the mood of the motorists who drive by these artistic creations every day.

Climate Control, Via Verde Project, Vertical Gardens
Image source: static.wixstatic.com

Among the plants in the vertical gardens are epiphytes which include ferns, lichens, mosses, cacti, bromeliads, and orchids. These hydroponic plants grow around metal frames buffered against highway pillars with fabric to avoid damaging the structure. The Via Verde serves as air filters, regulate heat and can decrease noise pollution. This project has gained international attention and hopefully many other regions will adopt an ecological solution such as this one to combat air pollution while promoting green awareness.

The I’s In Innovation

Innovation, Ideas, Invention, Business

The I’s In Innovation
By Kym Gordon Moore

When you hear mention of the word innovation, what comes to mind? Technology? Biometrics? Virtual reality? Androids? Data mining? Holograms? Wearable devices? Driverless cars? Let’s face it, innovation is nothing new, but it has become our sizzling buzzword of the century. Not to be confused with the word invention, innovation provides better solutions for a market’s unstipulated or existing needs.

In order to survive in today’s business climate, regardless of how large or small an organization is, or what industry they are in, the creation of new internal processes, new products, new additions to service offerings or overall business structures is vital. Innovation can refer to creating something new (an idea, method or device) or changes made to an existing product.

These 8 essential components will help you stay on target of your innovation strategy:

1. Ideas: Abstract concepts, mental representational images that you have in order to create, expand or reinvent your product or service for your organization.

2. Imagination: The creative ability to visualize, form, transform and integrate those ideas into functional products or solutions.

3. Inspiration: The process of learning through visual thinking or divine influence by moving intellect to motion and emotion.

4. Investigation: Discovering, studying, gathering or inquiring information and resources to produce an end-product for your users.

5. Identification: To recognize and establish your idea or invention into quantifiable and qualifiable opportunities and benefits to market your product or service.

6. Investment: A monetary, educational or time asset that will provide productivity for future profits and growth development of the organization.

7. Integrity: Ethics in all aspects of business practices influences the culture of attracting new customers, increases loyalty among current employees and affects the organization’s reputation in relationship building with stakeholders, business partners, and suppliers.

8. Influencer: Those individuals or influences (e.g. testimonials, reviews) who make a positive or negative impact on decision-making by potential buyers. Opportunities in your marketing activities, social influence, the power of persuasion, the collective teamwork of employees and other external interactions impact advocacy and promotion.

Innovation entails disruptive thinking, passion, putting your plan into place and unwavering perseverance, while delivering an excellent customer experience, by meeting their needs and making a difference in their lives.

 

Article source:
http://EzineArticles.com/?The-Is-In-Innovation&id=9773115

Blaming the Millennials? Really?

Millennials, Blame, Accusation, Commerce
Image source: Dawn Hudson

By Kym Gordon Moore
(Opinions in this commentary is based strictly on the author’s viewpoint)

Let’s face it, times are very different than they were a decade ago in every aspect of the word. Everything is changing whether we want them to or not. Adaptability to such change is never easy peasy for anyone. I continue to read a number of interesting articles and posts where there is a lot of finger pointing directed towards the Millennials. All too often the collapse of many current processes and industries has been unfairly dumped on them which were already systematically set up for eventual failure decades ago.

As a Baby Boomer, what was important and valuable to me growing up has been modified to the current generation of consumers. Millennials absorb and digest differently from the way we did at their age. The same happened with us compared to the times of our parents’ rearing. Even in the midst of some extremely turbulent events, we tried to adapt accordingly.

Yet as I read many articles arguing and blaming the collapse of once thriving industries on the Millennials, I have to cringe a bit. First, let me touch on education. We want our children to do better and excel further than we have, but with the exorbitant student loans that our young people face upon graduation from college and are unable to find a job that will pay enough to live, as well as, pay back their loans, it is nearly impossible to survive. I believe student loans at this point should be forgiven, because such an expense, even as it is reflected negatively on their credit report, will definitely affect if and how they purchase a vehicle, a house or even start and be able to support a family.

Much blaming and finger pointing is directed towards individuals who are facing difficulty and hardships as a result of many failed systems that no longer work in this current climate. There is no innovation in such cryptic and archaic processes because if there was a concerted effort made, the blame would not be directed at one specific group. To solve such dilemmas so they can fit our current times and trends has become slow and painful, just to carve out time to sit down and discuss how to quickly change broken systems.

We have our platforms on suggestions for innovation, adapting to artificial intelligence, inbound marketing, deep learning, business intelligence and such. I think all too often, we are so endowed in policies, procedures, and politics so stringently, that we forget how to feel, how to love and what it is like to be human.

As a leader, we seek to find new solutions and common ground by merging the changing of consumers to industries of the past. The last thing we need is to send consumers sailing over the edge of a cliff with the mindset to dictate, divide and conquer based on systems of the past. Clearly, how is it possible to invite and engage these new generations of consumers who will eventually replace us, if we are unable to effectively offer practical products and services, and then communicate with them sufficiently?

Before casting blame, perhaps we need to understand what the problem is, why the situation is the way it is and then move forward to solutions that would be beneficial to all.  Even die-hard veterans in the business have to look at the big picture with a new set of glasses. Any thoughts?

Fab Cab is LCCC innovation on wheels

With receiving freshly printed copies of a Stocker Arts Center 2017 brochure, Tracy Green, vice president of strategic and institutional development at Lorain County Community College, speaks passionately Aug. 15, 2017, about new developments at 1005 N. Abbe Road in Elyria. Carol Harper — The Morning Journal

A maker space on wheels rolls out in the form of a Fab Cab this school year from Lorain County Community College.

The Fab Cab is a mobile Fab Lab destined for Scout meetings, libraries, civic groups and school clubs throughout Lorain County, said Tracy Green, vice president of strategic and institutional development at LCCC at 1005 N. Abbe Road in Elyria.

The Fab Cab is one of many innovations introduced this month as LCCC continues a tradition of introducing locally cutting edge trends academically.

School starts Aug. 28 at LCCC, Green said, adding the crew enjoyed a great Jack Nicklaus golf outing Aug. 14 to raise money for scholarships.

Cindy Kushner, director of marketing and outreach initiatives at LCCC, said she is excited about the opportunity to talk about the first bachelor’s degree at the community college.

The Bachelor’s of Microelectronic Manufacturing meets a need of companies in Northeastern Ohio, Kushner said.

“And right now we have a wonderful associate’s degree we’re recruiting students into,” Green said.

The education stream follows a “learn and earn” model, Kushner said, with a student in class a couple of days a week, and working for an employer in the field and applying what they learned a few days a week.

“It’s very well received by students and employers,” she said.

The college is working with about 20 different companies across the region, such as Synapse Biomedical in Oberlin and Core Technology in Avon, Green said.

“It involves engineering technology jobs,” she said. “They’re working with companies that are making their products what we call, ‘smart.’

“So they’re embedding sensors. There are many, many sensors like what is in that phone. They’re taking those same types of sensors and they’re putting them into new products that can communicate and provide data outside of them.”

Examples are medical devices, workout equipment or athletic gear, Kushner said.

“It’s across the board,” she said. “It’s really everything.”

It’s a pretty significant movement, Green said.

“Now they have sensors embedded in running shoes so you can tell when you should be changing your shoes,” she said. “It will look at any type of wear and tear on the shoe and the stability of the insole, everything is becoming customized and providing data to the consumer so they can make decisions about when they should buy a new pair of shoes.”

“I used to be excited when they would light up,” Kushner said.

“Now they’re talking to our iPhones,” Green said.

The available labs limit starting the class to 12 students a semester for this stream.

Green said when she started her career, she had no idea it would lead to preparing students for these and similar innovations.

“Every day I wonder, ‘What’s going to happen new today?’” she asked. “Everything is different every day.

“You can’t even describe careers now because you have to be able to work across many different areas.”

So, LCCC built a new Campana Center for Ideation and Invention on the south edge of campus, with more new developments to add soon.

“Talking about cutting edge and innovation,” Green said. “When you’re talking about a career, sometimes it’s not working for someone else; it’s working for yourself and creating an entrepreneurial path. We have expanded our Fab Lab significantly. So someone can take that idea and turn it into a product and then get support working with our entrepreneurship program to be able to turn that product into a business.”

That’s what LCCC is excited about, Green said.

“Particularly as you talk about the next generation, we see that movement of folks who prefer to be their own boss, to be an entrepreneur themselves and to grow their own company,” she said. “It’s the ability to give them the tools and the resources to do that.

“Within that building, you can come in and you can design a new product on the computer. Using software you can view it in 3-D form in virtual reality, then go from that concept to a printed part using additive manufacturing and be able to hold that product in a matter of hours.”

Tech savvy can happen any time, but often starts young.

Kushner said she works a lot with students from kindergarten through grade 12.

She said she envisions a grandparent bringing a grandchild to the college to work on a project together.

“We have some very exciting programming for K-12 students that is going to inspire that entrepreneurial spirit in that world of making,” Kushner said.

Soon, the college will take the Fab Lab on the road through the Fab Cab, Green said.

“We can take that to a classroom, to a Girl Scout meeting, community libraries and have that experience out in the community and hopefully, have them come in and use the Campana Center,” Kushner said.

It fits inside a van, Green said, so it’s portable.

“On the partnership side, I’m really excited about the Master’s of Business Administration, the MBA,” Kushner said. “It’s with Lake Erie College. We have a good group — I think there’s room for a couple more — we have a nice group starting this fall on their Parker MBA through Lake Erie College in the Painesville area. They are just wonderful.”

And a new associate degree of Applied Science in Cyber and Information Security will enable students to prevent breeches in Internet access, and viruses, Green said.

For example, they would learn how hackers steal credit card information, and how to prevent hacker access, she said.

Not a new development for LCCC but possibly new information for Lorain residents, Kushner said, are two LCCC learning centers in Lorain.

One learning center is across from Lorain City Hall at 201 W. Erie Ave.

The other center is at Lorain High School at 2600 Ashland Ave.

“There’s confusion at the Lorain High School site,” Kushner said. “It’s for the community, not just for the high school.”

People in neighborhoods around Lorain High are welcome to take college classes there, she said, adding there are college programs designed for high school students that are not open to the general public.

Those are separate programs.

About 35 percent of high school seniors in Lorain County are graduating with some LCCC college credits, Kushner said, adding that’s “substantially higher than the rest of the state.”

“One other really cool thing is our support of veterans,” Green said. “We’re recognizing their knowledge and skills as they come back to civilian life.”

Veterans can access a fast track to civilian careers as paramedics, EMTs, technicians or other areas.

“They have already had a lot of that training,” Green said. “How do we help them translate that into a civilian career?”

Recently, LCCC released a new season schedule for the Stocker Arts Center, Green said.

“While we focus on students, we also know we are the community’s college,” she said.